Sunday, September 26, 2010

Hmmm

So I'm sitting here reading Andy's short story as my delicious home cooked chili simmers in the crock pot (yes I just said that to make all of you jealous)...anywho....

Observations: I can see the science fiction in it with the geocaching, but Andy claims he could not call his piece science fiction. Is it because this is science and not so much fiction? I know a portable GPS can be found just about anywhere, but I don't know if anybody actually does "geocaching" for fun. I am also noticing the same things I noticed about our earlier readings. Women women women. It's nice that we have the author easily accessible this time, so we can get clear answers to my seemingly repetitive questions: Why the female main character? Would a male character in this role work as well? And the slightly more disturbing question: why the lesbian love affairs? Would a gay male love affair be nearly as interesting?....probably not. Gross.

Also, has anyone else figured out exactly what we're supposed to do with the tor.com readings?

4 comments:

Courtney said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Courtney said...

During one of my numerous education seminars this semester they actually talked about geocaching and how to use it in the classroom. Several people in the room and the seminar speaker were avid "geocachers". The speaker even said he had been geocaching in several different countries. He said geocaching was the result of "what happened when nerds went outside."

And I think I missed something. What are the tor.com readings?

Caleb Weeks said...

I think you are supposed to read the top-trending or top-rated story on tor.com, but I am not 100% sure.

Ernest said...

I think using a protagonist who isn't a man or straight makes the piece more interesting by default. There isn't a huge library of material with LGBT or woman heroes, at least not when compared to the collection of material dealing with straight men.